Top 39 Diet Books
Original List by ZankRank

zero to paleo
You've seen all the celebrities and probably most of your friends jumping on the Paleo and gluten-free bandwagon recently and I'm really glad. Even though I've been promoting the dietary method for years, I'm not the least bit offended that it's finally catching on no thanks to me. Morse is one that had it all along (The Evolution Diet All natural and Allergy Free was way ahead of this current trend). Why? because it just makes sense. And it's important to make a distinction here, this isn't a diet book per se- it is a lifestyle book. The point isn't to lose weight with Zero to Paleo, the point is to understand how we were designed and get to and maintain your ideal weight. You will do this by learning about our ancestors, what they ate, and how they lived amzn.to/14YcZUv
the primal blueprint
by Mark Sisson is a journey through human evolution, comparing the life and robust health of our hunter-gatherer ancestors with a day in the life of a modern family. The author offers a solution in 10 empowering Blueprint Lifestyle Laws: eat lots of plants and animals, avoid poisonous things, move frequently at a slow pace, lift heavy things, sprint once in a while, get adequate sleep, play, get adequate sunlight, avoid stupid mistakes, and use your brain. The reader learns how the right high-fat diet can actually help one lose weight and how popular low-fat, grain-based diets might trigger illness, disease, and lifelong weight gain. The author presents a comprehensive, well thought out paleo style eating plan in a humorous and organized manner. He backs up all his work with research, natu bit.ly/eiJIIx
the paleo diet
by Loren Cordain. This revised edition features new weight-loss material and recipes plus the latest information drawn from breaking Paleolithic research. Published December 7, 2010. paleodiet.net/
For nearly two million years, humans and our hominid ancestors were eating in the hunter/gatherer style of foraging for a wide variety of healthy fruits and vegetables and then hunting and scavenging for large game. However, about 9,000 years ago, humans started eating in a manner contrary to their design, while living increasingly sedentary lives. In The Evolution Diet: All-Natural and Allergy Free, Joseph SB Morse shows how we can achieve ultimate health by emulating our ancestors’ hunter/gatherer lifestyle. You’re about to embark on an insightful, and often humorous journey to discover how humans evolved to eat, what cultureless humans would eat, and how we can use that knowledge with today’s technology and wealth to develop the ideal diet. Included in this edition is a detailed section evolution-diet.com
health secrets of the stone age
by Philip J. Goscienski MD. He suggests getting some exercise, eating more fruit and veggies, and cutting way back on the sugars/refined carbs. He suggests a Mediterranean diet and lifestyle that has grains at the bottom of its food pyramid. He uses the research of Alan Keys, research that was discredited by Gary Taubes in his much better and more scientifically researched book “Good Calories, Bad Calories”.
What
the paleo solution
by Robb Wolf, a research biochemist. Readers will understand digestion, how protein, carbohydrate and fat influence hormones, and how this plays into fat loss, health or disease. They’ll understand the significance of dietary fats whether the concern is performance, health, longevity, or making your fanny look good in a bikini. The book goes into how lifestyle factors such as sleep and stress influence the hormone cortisol. It gets into basic blood work and what things people should ask their doctor to include to better assess inflammation and health. It also includes a detailed 30-day meal plan and a beginner exercise program. The exercise program is geared to the beginner or someone who is quite de-conditioned but the nutritional info would be helpful for anyone regardless of background. bit.ly/ejYUkf
the evolution diet
other books have tried to get the most out of what we were designed to eat, but none have quite been as successful as the evolution diet. cordain and audette both have gotten close to what people in the stone age ate (though not completely), and both have created healthy diets. however, with our wea www.evolution-diet.com
practical paleo: a customized approach to health and a whole-foods lifestyle
Diane Sanfilippo: Our great-grandmothers didn't need nutrition lessons—then again, they weren't forced to wade through aisle after aisle of packaged foods touting outlandish health claims and confusing marketing jargon. Over the last few decades, we've forgotten what "real food" is—and we're left desperately seeking foods that will truly nourish our bodies. We're disillusioned with the "conventional wisdom" for good reason—it's gotten us nowhere.
you: on a diet
generally, the info is good- their message about inflammation is interesting and i have been hearing a lot about this (specifically on npr's "science friday"). inflammation is a great tool your body uses to heal, but it can also be detrimental if we allergically respond to things like tra
What
paleo diet
i picked up this book after being thoroughly intrigued by the concept of eating like a cavegirl, and i really liked the ideas espoused throughout, most notably the encouragement to eat foods that aren't processed. unnatural foods like margarin, doughnuts, and energy drinks aren't helpful to our he paleodiet.net
the new evolution diet
by Arthur De Vany. Art is the grandfather of the “Paleo Lifestyle” movement. The plan is built on three principles: (1) eat three meals a day made up of nonstarchy vegetables, fruits, and lean proteins- (2) skip meals occasionally to promote a low fasting blood insulin level- and (3) exercise less, not more, in shorter, high-intensity bursts. Note that the book is anti-fat. All oils are to be avoided, though canola is considered okay for higher temperatures. Egg yolks are to be skipped now and then. To be published December 21, 2010. [Kindle edition available now.] bit.ly/g4R4gY
zero to paleo
You've seen all the celebrities and probably most of your friends jumping on the Paleo and gluten-free bandwagon recently and I'm really glad. Even though I've been promoting the dietary method for years, I'm not the least bit offended that it's finally catching on no thanks to me. Morse is one that had it all along (The Evolution Diet All natural and Allergy Free was way ahead of this current trend). Why? because it just makes sense. And it's important to make a distinction here, this isn't a diet book per se- it is a lifestyle book. The point isn't to lose weight with Zero to Paleo, the point is to understand how we were designed and get to and maintain your ideal weight. You will do this by learning about our ancestors, what they ate, and how they lived amzn.to/14YcZUv
What
the paleo manifesto: ancient wisdom for lifelong health
John Durrant
http://paleohackscookbook.com paleohackscookbook.com
Loren Cordain
by Michael Pollan gives a guided tour of 20th century food science, a history of “nutritionism” in America and a look at the marriage of government and the food industry. Then the book presents a commonsense shopping-and-eating guide, which like the paleo diet focuses on shopping the perimeter of the supermarket. [Kindle edition available.] He also now has a much shorter Food Rules: An Eater’s Manual.
John Chatham
Melissa Joulwan
by Christian B. Allan, Wolfgang Lutz. It is based on Dr. Lutz’s work with thousands of patients in Austria. It deals with the health issues connected to high carb consumption. It is basically an English version and update of Dr. Lutz’s 1967 book with the same title: Leben ohne Brot. He recommends eating only 72 grams of carbohydrates, and an unlimited amount of fat. And provides evidence as to why this is the healthiest diet. Read the review at Amazon by Todd Moody (it will be first!). See excerpts from his earlier edition: Dismantling a Myth: The Role of Fat and Carbohydrates in our Diet
edited by Peter S. Ungar & Mark F. Teaford. This volume brings together experts in human and primate ecology, paleontology, and evolutionary medicine. Authors offer their unique perspectives on the evolution of the human diet and the implications of recent changes in diet for health and nutrition today. [Kindle edition available.]
reality diet
the major idea that schnur gets right is that carbs aren't necessarily bad for you and in fact, they're vital to one's health. nutritious carbs and non-nutritive fiber are a must when you want to keep your metabolism up and quite possibly lose weight. but why is the book so long??? i can tell you
the best life diet
as a diet plan, "the best life" is good and sensible like some of the others out there ("you: on a diet" and my favorite "the evolution diet" come to mind), and the physiology he describes (gradual loss) makes a lot of sense and fits with everything i know. i haven't f
neanderthin
by Mark Q. Sutton, Kristin D. Sobolik, and Jill K. Gardner is the analysis of prehistoric human diets and the interpretation of dietary intake in relation to health and nutrition. This is a substantial text that combines background to paleonutrition, an extensive bibliography, a discussion on methods, and case studies. Published February 23, 2010.
by J. Alexander. A story of how the author journeyed from a chubby, unhappy, and unaccepted child to a lean, healthy man through conscious eating of good, natural, unadulterated food. He shares recipes, nutritional information, and information on what foods to avoid. It is unknown how authentic his diet recommendations are. Published November 25, 2009.
eat fat, lose fat: the healthy alternative to trans fats
the south beach diet
i haven't lost any weight because i didn't really need to after e.d., but dr. agstston has a smart plan- get rid of the artificially extreme foods (i don't completely agree with getting rid of bread), and, after one month, start working in natural fruits and things you can't live without.
the fiber 35 diet
i've read a lot of diet books (i help people with acheiving healthier lifestyles) and this is by far one of the simplest- which is good. a lot of times, diets can get overcomplicated and burden the dieter with a lot of useless information.
the volumetrics eating plan
"consumer reports ranked this book #1" the back cover claims, and it's no wonder- this is a very easy-to-follow, simple concept and it works! dr. rolls hits on a well-established principle of eating things that make you feel fuller, while also costing less in the calorie department.
the abs diet for women
i too was a little thrown off when i saw a men's health guru writing a diet book (probably just to make it clear that the techniques in his first book-the abs diet were just as good for women as it is for men)
eat this not that
the possitives are the easy-to-follow magazine-style statistics and the intriguing numbers mr. z comes up with (you'd have to walk up the eiffle tower 2.5 times to burn off the calories in half of a bloomin onion!) . the negatives are that it seems there aren't any rules of thumb--each item is so
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